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theworldsgame:

An overhead view of Messi’s goal yesterday. Five defenders around and not one can stop him.

theworldsgame:

An overhead view of Messi’s goal yesterday. Five defenders around and not one can stop him.

The World Cup is this year

Oh shit. What a group. What a group.

The US Women’s team hitched a ride with some fans after their bus broke down. That’s dope.

The US Women’s team hitched a ride with some fans after their bus broke down. That’s dope.

Football + emotion | requested by anon

Highbury under the lights, 1951.

Highbury under the lights, 1951.

xiquarterly:

Can we get a grade on Jurgen Klinsmann’s sweater from last night?

xiquarterly:

Can we get a grade on Jurgen Klinsmann’s sweater from last night?

usnatarchives:

What a Sport Wednesday gets a kick today with a visit from Edson Arantes Nacimento, better known as Pelé. He stopped by the Rose Garden on June 28, 1975, to share some pointers on soccer with President Ford. In a background memo for the meeting Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, himself a soccer fan, noted that Pelé was not only one of the world’s foremost athletes but also the most highly paid at the time. Pelé’s career included several notable distinctions. He started playing for Brazil’s national team at 16, helped his country to achieve three consecutive World Cup victories, and became known for his exceptional playing style and spectacular goals. Pelé retired from his Brazilian club team Santos in 1974. The following year he signed a two-year contract with the New York Cosmos, a team in the North American Soccer League. For him this career move also served as an opportunity for cultural exchange. His popularity helped to increase awareness and interest in the sport in the United States.  After their meeting President Ford sent Pelé a photo of them together at the White House, inscribed to him “with admiration for one of the ‘all time’ super-stars and with appreciation for your contribution to better understanding between your fine people and mine. Very best wishes.” 
Image and text from the Ford Presidential Library Facebook page.
 

usnatarchives:

What a Sport Wednesday gets a kick today with a visit from Edson Arantes Nacimento, better known as Pelé. He stopped by the Rose Garden on June 28, 1975, to share some pointers on soccer with President Ford.

In a background memo for the meeting Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, himself a soccer fan, noted that Pelé was not only one of the world’s foremost athletes but also the most highly paid at the time. Pelé’s career included several notable distinctions. He started playing for Brazil’s national team at 16, helped his country to achieve three consecutive World Cup victories, and became known for his exceptional playing style and spectacular goals.

Pelé retired from his Brazilian club team Santos in 1974. The following year he signed a two-year contract with the New York Cosmos, a team in the North American Soccer League. For him this career move also served as an opportunity for cultural exchange. His popularity helped to increase awareness and interest in the sport in the United States.

After their meeting President Ford sent Pelé a photo of them together at the White House, inscribed to him “with admiration for one of the ‘all time’ super-stars and with appreciation for your contribution to better understanding between your fine people and mine. Very best wishes.”

Image and text from the Ford Presidential Library Facebook page.

 

soccerdotcom:

People leaving Wembley Stadium. Wow!

soccerdotcom:

People leaving Wembley Stadium. Wow!

Bayern Fans in The Emirates. This is the real deal. I love this sport.